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Old 04-17-2018, 01:03 AM   #1
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In-Depth Song Discussion #4---Sleep To Dream Her

Only played 50 times ever (only once by D+T..which is a killer version btw) since it's debut now 17 years ago. Only played 4 times in the last decade. I've never heard it live, still chasing it and would love to get it one of these days. I always really liked the song. It's not a top DMB song and probably not close to even top-100 for me, but it's certainly better than a lot of other ones, and slightly above the "middle" of the catalog to me. It's a good studio track and imo Roi's shining moment and best contribution to the ED album. While lyrically it's not Dave's best, it still has a haunting quality to it that I like, and the song itself is super complex musicianship-wise. Odd time signature and really flowing.

Is there a specific performance out of those 50 that stand out? I'd love to know. The D+T version is worth listening to if you haven't just for the sheer interest of it. Dave has also played it solo once which I haven't heard. 3/25/03 is the D+T version. I did really enjoy the 05.29.13 version when they busted it out on that tour, thought 3.0 did a nice job on it. Would have liked to have seen the band try it out in the acoustic sets when they were doing that, but oh well.
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Old 04-17-2018, 05:53 AM   #2
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7/30/03 has always been my favourite version. Roi holds his final note for about 20 seconds.

Yeah, this is a good filler song.

Oh yeah, remember the laughter that ensued when this segue popped up on 5/29/13?

Sleep to Dream Her
Hunger for the Great Light
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Old 04-17-2018, 06:46 AM   #3
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Always liked the song. A bit underrated. The lyrics are actually pretty good (as they are for most of that album). Dave and Tim version doesn’t do much for me. The 3.0 version is very good, including the tasteful trumpet at the end.

You’re right on that this is a moody and haunting song. A song you could compare it to might be Stolen Away, and this is much better.
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Old 04-17-2018, 07:29 AM   #4
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I’ve always found it trite and dull, but Roi could almost make it worth listening to most of the time.
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Old 04-17-2018, 12:01 PM   #5
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I like Roi on it as most others have said over the years. It's strangely enjoyable.

Reminds me of being in the woods in Zelda.
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Old 04-17-2018, 12:03 PM   #6
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Love the “it seems so unnerving.....” line. Might be my favorite DM lyric.
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Old 04-17-2018, 12:05 PM   #7
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Love the “it seems so unnerving.....” line. Might be my favorite DM lyric.
You love Ballard so much.
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Old 04-17-2018, 12:05 PM   #8
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Old 04-17-2018, 12:20 PM   #9
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Don't care for the song.
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Old 04-17-2018, 01:17 PM   #10
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Old 04-17-2018, 02:45 PM   #11
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I am convinced the only reason this song was played at Blossom in 2008 was because Dave was given a copy of the Blossom setlist from 2006 and thought "oh yeah that song, we should play that again"

Also, I distinctly remember watching an Everyday teaser video in early 2001 and hearing the Sax line from this song and immediately thinking it was fantastic.
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Old 04-17-2018, 02:47 PM   #12
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I like this song. They wrote a great part for Roi. Had it been on a DM solo album like it should've been I bet it would've had a better reception.
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Old 04-18-2018, 07:47 AM   #13
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You love Ballard so much.
I'm just assuming Dave wrote those lyrics, but if Ballard helped, then good for him!
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Old 04-18-2018, 08:37 AM   #14
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Ok, you want in-depth discussion? Let's do in-depth discussion.

Sleep to Dream Her, ladies and gentlemen:

I'm finding it pretty hard to put into words just how fascinating I think the construction of this song is. Dave has this amazing ear sometimes for formulations that wander outside of key signatures, doing really unconventional things for pop music, but that don't sound confusing or alien. Like, Too Much does three really strange transitions: the riff starts on D major and ends on Bb major, the song's verse starts on F# major right after that Bb major, and then at the end of the verse it goes from F# back to that D. All three of these transitions are to a chord that is notably outside the current key, but the interesting thing is that all three are the same transition, theoretically speaking - jumping to a major chord on a note a major third down. So he introduces a particular chord change that is unusual and potentially off-putting, but then uses that specific chord change in three different contexts, unifying the sound of the piece.

Sleep To Dream Her is like that but way moreso.

So this verse walkdown. The verse is made of a repeating pattern of four chords that keeps getting transposed down. The general idea is that the lowest note walks down by a half step twice, then the highest note walks down by a half step twice, then repeat. This is consistent enough that it provides the listener with a pattern to expect as the song progresses so that even though the song changes key with every single one of these repeated patterns, it's not off-putting.

The first chord is a B major with the D#, the third, in the bass, also known as first inversion. D#, F#, B. This is already fairly unusual, but Dave likes first inversion chords - that first chord in Too Much, and Tripping Billies, is a D chord in first inversion. Anyway, then the bass note walks down from D# to D to C#. On D, that makes a B minor chord, still in first inversion - typical enough. This is the same move that Trey's song Waste does over the "be" in the line "if I could be"; a transition that's unusual, but certainly within the pop canon. But then he gets to that C# note, and now we're in a weird place. The chord goes C#, F#, B - stacked fourths. I don't know of a single other place in Dave's songwriting where he sits on stacked fourths. If you're a guitar player, just play that chord all by itself - it's full of strange tension, but doesn't seem to lead anywhere in particular. Dave resolves it by then pulling the B down a half-step, giving us C#, F#, A#, which is an F# major chord in second inversion. He almost never uses second inversions, but aside from that, this makes the whole progression so far make sense, because F# is the V chord in the key of B major, so we've used this chromatic transition to get to a very typical endpoint, albeit in a weird inversion, and the pull from here is to go back to B major. (If you're a guitar player, try playing just the first four chords in a loop, going back to the B major at the beginning after that F#, and feel how traditionally satisfying that sounds.)

But then Dave doesn't go back to the B major. Instead, he keeps the C# in the bass and moves the highest note chromatically again, down a half step to A, and gives us C#, E, A, which is an A major chord in first inversion. We're back to where we started, but an entire whole step downwards. The Beatles would occasionally pull shit like this, but it's pretty rare to come across anywhere else; it's a standard pop music move to jump UP a whole step, usually just before the last verse or chorus (a particularly on-the-nose example of this is REM's Stand), to add forward momentum, but repeating a pattern DOWN a whole step almost never happens. The A major chord we're on right now is not in the original key signature; relative to the starting point, it's a flat VII chord. This is sometimes used in pop music in place of a V chord, sometimes analyzed as a IV-of-IV chord - this is called a "surrogate dominant", since the V chord is referred to as the dominant chord and usually pulls to resolve back to the root, but the IV-of-IV can be used for that purpose instead. However, any sense that this is what Dave intends here is thrown out the window when he repeats the above pattern again and ends us on an E major chord (a whole step down from the first progression's F# major chord) which, by analogy to the first progression, now feels like it's pulling back to A the way the first progression pulled back to B. That said, E major IS in the original key of B major, so if he stopped here and went back to the original B, your ear would readjust back to feeling like the entire progression had been in B major. (Again, if you have a guitar, try this.)

But THEN HE DOES IT AGAIN, and now we're on G major in first inversion (B, D, G), and we have left the reservation. There is no way to get back to B major gracefully from here, at least not at first glance. G major in first inversion, to G minor in first inversion, to the transitional stacked fourths, to D major in second inversion (A, D, F#). By now you're expecting the same progression to happen again, a forever descending chord progression that's inescapable. But now he surprises, and takes that high note down a whole step to E, giving us A, D, E - another transitional chord with tension from the D and E, which he resolves by pulling the D town to a C# and giving us the first chord in the entire progression that is actually resting on its root note - a normal A major chord, A, C#, E. This is a bizarre place to resolve from a starting point of B major, but it feels like a resolution because of the fact that it's the first chord that lands on a root, and it feels unified because that step from D to C# is the same type of resolution that he uses to land on the last chord of each mini-progression. That's the same movement that gets us from the stacked fourths to the F#, then the next stacked fourths to the E, then the next stacked fourths to the D, so we're primed to hear that as a resolution. That, plus the root note being on the bottom, means we feel like we've arrived somewhere.

So then, either the verse begins again, or we move to that instrumental break. If we go back to the verse, then the entire resolution gets retroactively rewritten, because that's a transition from A major to B major, and we remember B major as the original starting point, and THAT feels like that use of flat-VIII as a surrogate dominant that I mentioned earlier.

But if we go into the instrumental break, he pulls another fucked up move, and takes us from the A major to an F major, which isn't in ANY of the key signatures so far. Two things make this work. One, F major IS a chord in the key of A minor, so this also has something of the same effect as the very first movement in the verse riff that goes from a major chord to the same minor chord each time. We hear the C# in the A major chord going to the C natural in the F major chord much the same way. And two, if the verse progression had continued normally instead of resolving to the A, the next chord would have been an F major chord, so in some sense it feels like the resolution of a self-fulfilling prophecy - the chord we were expecting to hear but we never got. This is fucking genius, all the more so for, I'm guessing, being totally intuitive.

So, the instrumental break goes like this: F major, E major, A major; then F major, E major, D major. And the first part of that makes sense, once you wrap your head around how amazing that use of F major is - we do another chromatic step (this song is full of them) to E major, then that is the dominant V chord of A major, so we go back to A major. Great. It's a little surprising, because we're sort of expecting A minor now (again, if you have a guitar, play F major, E major, A minor instead and hear how that sounds much more traditionally satisfying), but we were on A major just a second ago, so that's fine. Then it goes again - genius move to F, E major, we're ready for the last A major and:

D MAJOR.

The fuck?!

This lands with such emphasis that we feel as though the song should resolve to this chord completely; indeed, it is ultimately the last chord in the song. So then we, in our minds, have to background-reanalyze the last two chords. If we actually secretly were in D major all along instead of A major, then A was the dominant V of D major, and this walkdown - F major, E major, D major, is the sort of blues flat-III thing that the Beatles love (like the third chord in the verse of Back in the USSR), or the verse progression in Mercury by Counting Crows: I, major-II, major-flat-III, major-II, I.

But we're not even done, because the saxophone line on that D chord goes A, D, G, D, F#. It ends on F#. And then the verse starts back up again with a B major chord, which has F# in it.

Let's look at that last transition a little more closely, shall we? We go from a D major that feels first-inversion-y (because of the emphasis on that F#) to a B major. D major to B major. That's going down a minor third. As you might expect by now, B major is not in the key of D major; this is a strange jump. But every sectional transition in the verse does exactly this jump, just in the other direction - F# major to A major in first inversion; that's UP a minor third. Then E major to G major - UP a minor third. So Dave uses exactly the same leap to get us from the break back to the verse, except backwards. We're used to hearing that change so it doesn't sound unexpected or alien, but because it goes in the other direction it sounds like we're winding back up the machine that will slowly wind down over the course of the verse.

tl;dr: I know it's kind of boring live, but this song is fucking great. I will fight you.
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Old 04-18-2018, 08:49 AM   #15
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Ok, you want in-depth discussion? Let's do in-depth discussion.

Sleep to Dream Her, ladies and gentlemen:

I'm finding it pretty hard to put into words just how fascinating I think the construction of this song is. Dave has this amazing ear sometimes for formulations that wander outside of key signatures, doing really unconventional things for pop music, but that don't sound confusing or alien. Like, Too Much does three really strange transitions: the riff starts on D major and ends on Bb major, the song's verse starts on F# major right after that Bb major, and then at the end of the verse it goes from F# back to that D. All three of these transitions are to a chord that is notably outside the current key, but the interesting thing is that all three are the same transition, theoretically speaking - jumping to a major chord on a note a major third down. So he introduces a particular chord change that is unusual and potentially off-putting, but then uses that specific chord change in three different contexts, unifying the sound of the piece.

Sleep To Dream Her is like that but way moreso.

So this verse walkdown. The verse is made of a repeating pattern of four chords that keeps getting transposed down. The general idea is that the lowest note walks down by a half step twice, then the highest note walks down by a half step twice, then repeat. This is consistent enough that it provides the listener with a pattern to expect as the song progresses so that even though the song changes key with every single one of these repeated patterns, it's not off-putting.

The first chord is a B major with the D#, the third, in the bass, also known as first inversion. D#, F#, B. This is already fairly unusual, but Dave likes first inversion chords - that first chord in Too Much, and Tripping Billies, is a D chord in first inversion. Anyway, then the bass note walks down from D# to D to C#. On D, that makes a B minor chord, still in first inversion - typical enough. This is the same move that Trey's song Waste does over the "be" in the line "if I could be"; a transition that's unusual, but certainly within the pop canon. But then he gets to that C# note, and now we're in a weird place. The chord goes C#, F#, B - stacked fourths. I don't know of a single other place in Dave's songwriting where he sits on stacked fourths. If you're a guitar player, just play that chord all by itself - it's full of strange tension, but doesn't seem to lead anywhere in particular. Dave resolves it by then pulling the B down a half-step, giving us C#, F#, A#, which is an F# major chord in second inversion. He almost never uses second inversions, but aside from that, this makes the whole progression so far make sense, because F# is the V chord in the key of B major, so we've used this chromatic transition to get to a very typical endpoint, albeit in a weird inversion, and the pull from here is to go back to B major. (If you're a guitar player, try playing just the first four chords in a loop, going back to the B major at the beginning after that F#, and feel how traditionally satisfying that sounds.)

But then Dave doesn't go back to the B major. Instead, he keeps the C# in the bass and moves the highest note chromatically again, down a half step to A, and gives us C#, E, A, which is an A major chord in first inversion. We're back to where we started, but an entire whole step downwards. The Beatles would occasionally pull shit like this, but it's pretty rare to come across anywhere else; it's a standard pop music move to jump UP a whole step, usually just before the last verse or chorus (a particularly on-the-nose example of this is REM's Stand), to add forward momentum, but repeating a pattern DOWN a whole step almost never happens. The A major chord we're on right now is not in the original key signature; relative to the starting point, it's a flat VII chord. This is sometimes used in pop music in place of a V chord, sometimes analyzed as a IV-of-IV chord - this is called a "surrogate dominant", since the V chord is referred to as the dominant chord and usually pulls to resolve back to the root, but the IV-of-IV can be used for that purpose instead. However, any sense that this is what Dave intends here is thrown out the window when he repeats the above pattern again and ends us on an E major chord (a whole step down from the first progression's F# major chord) which, by analogy to the first progression, now feels like it's pulling back to A the way the first progression pulled back to B. That said, E major IS in the original key of B major, so if he stopped here and went back to the original B, your ear would readjust back to feeling like the entire progression had been in B major. (Again, if you have a guitar, try this.)

But THEN HE DOES IT AGAIN, and now we're on G major in first inversion (B, D, G), and we have left the reservation. There is no way to get back to B major gracefully from here, at least not at first glance. G major in first inversion, to G minor in first inversion, to the transitional stacked fourths, to D major in second inversion (A, D, F#). By now you're expecting the same progression to happen again, a forever descending chord progression that's inescapable. But now he surprises, and takes that high note down a whole step to E, giving us A, D, E - another transitional chord with tension from the D and E, which he resolves by pulling the D town to a C# and giving us the first chord in the entire progression that is actually resting on its root note - a normal A major chord, A, C#, E. This is a bizarre place to resolve from a starting point of B major, but it feels like a resolution because of the fact that it's the first chord that lands on a root, and it feels unified because that step from D to C# is the same type of resolution that he uses to land on the last chord of each mini-progression. That's the same movement that gets us from the stacked fourths to the F#, then the next stacked fourths to the E, then the next stacked fourths to the D, so we're primed to hear that as a resolution. That, plus the root note being on the bottom, means we feel like we've arrived somewhere.

So then, either the verse begins again, or we move to that instrumental break. If we go back to the verse, then the entire resolution gets retroactively rewritten, because that's a transition from A major to B major, and we remember B major as the original starting point, and THAT feels like that use of flat-VIII as a surrogate dominant that I mentioned earlier.

But if we go into the instrumental break, he pulls another fucked up move, and takes us from the A major to an F major, which isn't in ANY of the key signatures so far. Two things make this work. One, F major IS a chord in the key of A minor, so this also has something of the same effect as the very first movement in the verse riff that goes from a major chord to the same minor chord each time. We hear the C# in the A major chord going to the C natural in the F major chord much the same way. And two, if the verse progression had continued normally instead of resolving to the A, the next chord would have been an F major chord, so in some sense it feels like the resolution of a self-fulfilling prophecy - the chord we were expecting to hear but we never got. This is fucking genius, all the more so for, I'm guessing, being totally intuitive.

So, the instrumental break goes like this: F major, E major, A major; then F major, E major, D major. And the first part of that makes sense, once you wrap your head around how amazing that use of F major is - we do another chromatic step (this song is full of them) to E major, then that is the dominant V chord of A major, so we go back to A major. Great. It's a little surprising, because we're sort of expecting A minor now (again, if you have a guitar, play F major, E major, A minor instead and hear how that sounds much more traditionally satisfying), but we were on A major just a second ago, so that's fine. Then it goes again - genius move to F, E major, we're ready for the last A major and:

D MAJOR.

The fuck?!

This lands with such emphasis that we feel as though the song should resolve to this chord completely; indeed, it is ultimately the last chord in the song. So then we, in our minds, have to background-reanalyze the last two chords. If we actually secretly were in D major all along instead of A major, then A was the dominant V of D major, and this walkdown - F major, E major, D major, is the sort of blues flat-III thing that the Beatles love (like the third chord in the verse of Back in the USSR), or the verse progression in Mercury by Counting Crows: I, major-II, major-flat-III, major-II, I.

But we're not even done, because the saxophone line on that D chord goes A, D, G, D, F#. It ends on F#. And then the verse starts back up again with a B major chord, which has F# in it.

Let's look at that last transition a little more closely, shall we? We go from a D major that feels first-inversion-y (because of the emphasis on that F#) to a B major. D major to B major. That's going down a minor third. As you might expect by now, B major is not in the key of D major; this is a strange jump. But every sectional transition in the verse does exactly this jump, just in the other direction - F# major to A major in first inversion; that's UP a minor third. Then E major to G major - UP a minor third. So Dave uses exactly the same leap to get us from the break back to the verse, except backwards. We're used to hearing that change so it doesn't sound unexpected or alien, but because it goes in the other direction it sounds like we're winding back up the machine that will slowly wind down over the course of the verse.

tl;dr: I know it's kind of boring live, but this song is fucking great. I will fight you.
Excellent analysis. Dave really has an ear for interesting things, but I doubt he understands much of the significance of the theory behind this song.
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Old 04-18-2018, 09:15 AM   #16
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this song is fucking great. I will fight you.


Really great post though Thrawn. And I agree, I like it a lot as well.
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Old 04-18-2018, 09:32 AM   #17
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Ok, you want in-depth discussion? Let's do in-depth discussion.

Sleep to Dream Her, ladies and gentlemen:

I'm finding it pretty hard to put into words just how fascinating I think the construction of this song is. Dave has this amazing ear sometimes for formulations that wander outside of key signatures, doing really unconventional things for pop music, but that don't sound confusing or alien. Like, Too Much does three really strange transitions: the riff starts on D major and ends on Bb major, the song's verse starts on F# major right after that Bb major, and then at the end of the verse it goes from F# back to that D. All three of these transitions are to a chord that is notably outside the current key, but the interesting thing is that all three are the same transition, theoretically speaking - jumping to a major chord on a note a major third down. So he introduces a particular chord change that is unusual and potentially off-putting, but then uses that specific chord change in three different contexts, unifying the sound of the piece.

Sleep To Dream Her is like that but way moreso.

So this verse walkdown. The verse is made of a repeating pattern of four chords that keeps getting transposed down. The general idea is that the lowest note walks down by a half step twice, then the highest note walks down by a half step twice, then repeat. This is consistent enough that it provides the listener with a pattern to expect as the song progresses so that even though the song changes key with every single one of these repeated patterns, it's not off-putting.

The first chord is a B major with the D#, the third, in the bass, also known as first inversion. D#, F#, B. This is already fairly unusual, but Dave likes first inversion chords - that first chord in Too Much, and Tripping Billies, is a D chord in first inversion. Anyway, then the bass note walks down from D# to D to C#. On D, that makes a B minor chord, still in first inversion - typical enough. This is the same move that Trey's song Waste does over the "be" in the line "if I could be"; a transition that's unusual, but certainly within the pop canon. But then he gets to that C# note, and now we're in a weird place. The chord goes C#, F#, B - stacked fourths. I don't know of a single other place in Dave's songwriting where he sits on stacked fourths. If you're a guitar player, just play that chord all by itself - it's full of strange tension, but doesn't seem to lead anywhere in particular. Dave resolves it by then pulling the B down a half-step, giving us C#, F#, A#, which is an F# major chord in second inversion. He almost never uses second inversions, but aside from that, this makes the whole progression so far make sense, because F# is the V chord in the key of B major, so we've used this chromatic transition to get to a very typical endpoint, albeit in a weird inversion, and the pull from here is to go back to B major. (If you're a guitar player, try playing just the first four chords in a loop, going back to the B major at the beginning after that F#, and feel how traditionally satisfying that sounds.)

But then Dave doesn't go back to the B major. Instead, he keeps the C# in the bass and moves the highest note chromatically again, down a half step to A, and gives us C#, E, A, which is an A major chord in first inversion. We're back to where we started, but an entire whole step downwards. The Beatles would occasionally pull shit like this, but it's pretty rare to come across anywhere else; it's a standard pop music move to jump UP a whole step, usually just before the last verse or chorus (a particularly on-the-nose example of this is REM's Stand), to add forward momentum, but repeating a pattern DOWN a whole step almost never happens. The A major chord we're on right now is not in the original key signature; relative to the starting point, it's a flat VII chord. This is sometimes used in pop music in place of a V chord, sometimes analyzed as a IV-of-IV chord - this is called a "surrogate dominant", since the V chord is referred to as the dominant chord and usually pulls to resolve back to the root, but the IV-of-IV can be used for that purpose instead. However, any sense that this is what Dave intends here is thrown out the window when he repeats the above pattern again and ends us on an E major chord (a whole step down from the first progression's F# major chord) which, by analogy to the first progression, now feels like it's pulling back to A the way the first progression pulled back to B. That said, E major IS in the original key of B major, so if he stopped here and went back to the original B, your ear would readjust back to feeling like the entire progression had been in B major. (Again, if you have a guitar, try this.)

But THEN HE DOES IT AGAIN, and now we're on G major in first inversion (B, D, G), and we have left the reservation. There is no way to get back to B major gracefully from here, at least not at first glance. G major in first inversion, to G minor in first inversion, to the transitional stacked fourths, to D major in second inversion (A, D, F#). By now you're expecting the same progression to happen again, a forever descending chord progression that's inescapable. But now he surprises, and takes that high note down a whole step to E, giving us A, D, E - another transitional chord with tension from the D and E, which he resolves by pulling the D town to a C# and giving us the first chord in the entire progression that is actually resting on its root note - a normal A major chord, A, C#, E. This is a bizarre place to resolve from a starting point of B major, but it feels like a resolution because of the fact that it's the first chord that lands on a root, and it feels unified because that step from D to C# is the same type of resolution that he uses to land on the last chord of each mini-progression. That's the same movement that gets us from the stacked fourths to the F#, then the next stacked fourths to the E, then the next stacked fourths to the D, so we're primed to hear that as a resolution. That, plus the root note being on the bottom, means we feel like we've arrived somewhere.

So then, either the verse begins again, or we move to that instrumental break. If we go back to the verse, then the entire resolution gets retroactively rewritten, because that's a transition from A major to B major, and we remember B major as the original starting point, and THAT feels like that use of flat-VIII as a surrogate dominant that I mentioned earlier.

But if we go into the instrumental break, he pulls another fucked up move, and takes us from the A major to an F major, which isn't in ANY of the key signatures so far. Two things make this work. One, F major IS a chord in the key of A minor, so this also has something of the same effect as the very first movement in the verse riff that goes from a major chord to the same minor chord each time. We hear the C# in the A major chord going to the C natural in the F major chord much the same way. And two, if the verse progression had continued normally instead of resolving to the A, the next chord would have been an F major chord, so in some sense it feels like the resolution of a self-fulfilling prophecy - the chord we were expecting to hear but we never got. This is fucking genius, all the more so for, I'm guessing, being totally intuitive.

So, the instrumental break goes like this: F major, E major, A major; then F major, E major, D major. And the first part of that makes sense, once you wrap your head around how amazing that use of F major is - we do another chromatic step (this song is full of them) to E major, then that is the dominant V chord of A major, so we go back to A major. Great. It's a little surprising, because we're sort of expecting A minor now (again, if you have a guitar, play F major, E major, A minor instead and hear how that sounds much more traditionally satisfying), but we were on A major just a second ago, so that's fine. Then it goes again - genius move to F, E major, we're ready for the last A major and:

D MAJOR.

The fuck?!

This lands with such emphasis that we feel as though the song should resolve to this chord completely; indeed, it is ultimately the last chord in the song. So then we, in our minds, have to background-reanalyze the last two chords. If we actually secretly were in D major all along instead of A major, then A was the dominant V of D major, and this walkdown - F major, E major, D major, is the sort of blues flat-III thing that the Beatles love (like the third chord in the verse of Back in the USSR), or the verse progression in Mercury by Counting Crows: I, major-II, major-flat-III, major-II, I.

But we're not even done, because the saxophone line on that D chord goes A, D, G, D, F#. It ends on F#. And then the verse starts back up again with a B major chord, which has F# in it.

Let's look at that last transition a little more closely, shall we? We go from a D major that feels first-inversion-y (because of the emphasis on that F#) to a B major. D major to B major. That's going down a minor third. As you might expect by now, B major is not in the key of D major; this is a strange jump. But every sectional transition in the verse does exactly this jump, just in the other direction - F# major to A major in first inversion; that's UP a minor third. Then E major to G major - UP a minor third. So Dave uses exactly the same leap to get us from the break back to the verse, except backwards. We're used to hearing that change so it doesn't sound unexpected or alien, but because it goes in the other direction it sounds like we're winding back up the machine that will slowly wind down over the course of the verse.

tl;dr: I know it's kind of boring live, but this song is fucking great. I will fight you.
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Old 04-18-2018, 12:25 PM   #18
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There is only one officially released STDH right? LT 26?
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Old 04-18-2018, 12:36 PM   #19
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Well with the new WH disc out, they should just release this full damn show already
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Old 04-18-2018, 12:43 PM   #20
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There is only one officially released STDH right? LT 26?
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