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Old 07-29-2020, 02:15 PM   #4241
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Those weren’t even close, bud. Instead of Florida having 1/15th the daily deaths of NY, it has 1/5th. My point still remains and it’s still pretty obvious. But you deserve credit for trying to squeeze that false equivalency in, I would’ve tried to do the same thing.

This tells the real story:

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Originally Posted by mario View Post
Without the sort of shutdown that we're seeing now, 80% of people would be infected and 4 million people would die within three months.

With "mitigation" strategies in place (all symptomatic cases in the US in isolation. Families of those cases quarantined. All Americans over 70 social distancing) 2 million people die in the next 3 months.

BUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUT

If we ever relax the suppression levels back to "mitigation" policies, we go right back to 2 million people dead within three months.

This continues until there is a disseminated vaccine, currently 18 months from now.
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Old 07-29-2020, 02:17 PM   #4242
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Also, that shows Louisiana as having more cases then NY but wayyyyyy less deaths. If that doesn’t tell you far more people had it in March/April than what was recorded because a lack of testing, I don’t know what else will.

That tells me at a 0.1-0.5% CFR, with 32,000 deaths, NY (state) may have had upwards of 6.4 million actual infections. That’d be 1/3 of the whole state’s population.
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From this past spring:

Quote:
Originally Posted by mario View Post
Without the sort of shutdown that we're seeing now, 80% of people would be infected and 4 million people would die within three months.

With "mitigation" strategies in place (all symptomatic cases in the US in isolation. Families of those cases quarantined. All Americans over 70 social distancing) 2 million people die in the next 3 months.

BUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUT

If we ever relax the suppression levels back to "mitigation" policies, we go right back to 2 million people dead within three months.

This continues until there is a disseminated vaccine, currently 18 months from now.
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Old 07-29-2020, 02:28 PM   #4243
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Originally Posted by Tambourine Man View Post
I saw that healthcare workers in CO are blocking the cars from protesting.

I really didn’t want to go there but: fuck these people. Nurses make $100k/year with full benefits. I don’t feel sorry for them at all that they might catch a flu that’s not going to do anything to them. Such a stupid opportunity that they’re fully exploiting to jerk themselves off.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh.0 View Post
The fact that they came outside in their scrubs - which they’re supposed to be keeping as clean and “uncompromised” as possible - tells you it was virtue signaling in an attempt to go viral. Just like all of the dumb TikTok videos that bored nurses in empty hospitals have been putting together across the country the last few weeks
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Old 07-29-2020, 02:49 PM   #4244
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Good luck waiting/hoping for 1K per day, bud. You’ll die yourself long before Florida gets to 1K. You don’t even talk about Texas anymore.
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Sober Thoughts with Mario: A TDC+ Exclusive

Vol. 3

From this past spring:

Quote:
Originally Posted by mario View Post
Without the sort of shutdown that we're seeing now, 80% of people would be infected and 4 million people would die within three months.

With "mitigation" strategies in place (all symptomatic cases in the US in isolation. Families of those cases quarantined. All Americans over 70 social distancing) 2 million people die in the next 3 months.

BUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUT

If we ever relax the suppression levels back to "mitigation" policies, we go right back to 2 million people dead within three months.

This continues until there is a disseminated vaccine, currently 18 months from now.
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Old 07-29-2020, 02:56 PM   #4245
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Here’s the other embarrassing thing for NY:

Florida has more people and will have fewer deaths/1M by a wide margin....yet Florida has an older population (42.2) compared to New York (39)! Way less people are dying there despite the illness being far more deadly in older people.

You guys are going to burn yourselves out defending Cuomo for years to come.
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Sober Thoughts with Mario: A TDC+ Exclusive

Vol. 3

From this past spring:

Quote:
Originally Posted by mario View Post
Without the sort of shutdown that we're seeing now, 80% of people would be infected and 4 million people would die within three months.

With "mitigation" strategies in place (all symptomatic cases in the US in isolation. Families of those cases quarantined. All Americans over 70 social distancing) 2 million people die in the next 3 months.

BUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUT

If we ever relax the suppression levels back to "mitigation" policies, we go right back to 2 million people dead within three months.

This continues until there is a disseminated vaccine, currently 18 months from now.
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Old 07-29-2020, 02:59 PM   #4246
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More than six in 10 voters say a [Only registered users can see links.] and potentially allows the virus to spread further, according to a new poll.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tambourine Man View Post
I saw that healthcare workers in CO are blocking the cars from protesting.

I really didn’t want to go there but: fuck these people. Nurses make $100k/year with full benefits. I don’t feel sorry for them at all that they might catch a flu that’s not going to do anything to them. Such a stupid opportunity that they’re fully exploiting to jerk themselves off.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh.0 View Post
The fact that they came outside in their scrubs - which they’re supposed to be keeping as clean and “uncompromised” as possible - tells you it was virtue signaling in an attempt to go viral. Just like all of the dumb TikTok videos that bored nurses in empty hospitals have been putting together across the country the last few weeks
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Old 07-29-2020, 03:03 PM   #4247
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh.0 View Post


Good luck waiting/hoping for 1K per day, bud. You’ll die yourself long before Florida gets to 1K. You don’t even talk about Texas anymore.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tambourine Man View Post
I saw that healthcare workers in CO are blocking the cars from protesting.

I really didn’t want to go there but: fuck these people. Nurses make $100k/year with full benefits. I don’t feel sorry for them at all that they might catch a flu that’s not going to do anything to them. Such a stupid opportunity that they’re fully exploiting to jerk themselves off.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh.0 View Post
The fact that they came outside in their scrubs - which they’re supposed to be keeping as clean and “uncompromised” as possible - tells you it was virtue signaling in an attempt to go viral. Just like all of the dumb TikTok videos that bored nurses in empty hospitals have been putting together across the country the last few weeks
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Old 07-29-2020, 03:24 PM   #4248
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Quick question:


In the great Florida v. New York City wars that must be decided to determine... something... how many points does Florida get charged with for killing the MLB season?
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tambourine Man View Post
I saw that healthcare workers in CO are blocking the cars from protesting.

I really didn’t want to go there but: fuck these people. Nurses make $100k/year with full benefits. I don’t feel sorry for them at all that they might catch a flu that’s not going to do anything to them. Such a stupid opportunity that they’re fully exploiting to jerk themselves off.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh.0 View Post
The fact that they came outside in their scrubs - which they’re supposed to be keeping as clean and “uncompromised” as possible - tells you it was virtue signaling in an attempt to go viral. Just like all of the dumb TikTok videos that bored nurses in empty hospitals have been putting together across the country the last few weeks
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Old 07-29-2020, 03:27 PM   #4249
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Quote:
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Yeah you’ve used this before, and you know it was a tongue in cheek joke about the ever changing death models, but your whole shtick it to misrepresent people and take things out of context. It’s the only way you know how to board, it’s the only way you know how to feed yourself.
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Sober Thoughts with Mario: A TDC+ Exclusive

Vol. 3

From this past spring:

Quote:
Originally Posted by mario View Post
Without the sort of shutdown that we're seeing now, 80% of people would be infected and 4 million people would die within three months.

With "mitigation" strategies in place (all symptomatic cases in the US in isolation. Families of those cases quarantined. All Americans over 70 social distancing) 2 million people die in the next 3 months.

BUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUT

If we ever relax the suppression levels back to "mitigation" policies, we go right back to 2 million people dead within three months.

This continues until there is a disseminated vaccine, currently 18 months from now.
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Old 07-29-2020, 03:29 PM   #4250
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mario View Post
Quick question:


In the great Florida v. New York City wars that must be decided to determine... something... how many points does Florida get charged with for killing the MLB season?
No idea, but a little less than Andrew Cuomo should be charged for killing 6,000+ nursing home patients.
__________________
Sober Thoughts with Mario: A TDC+ Exclusive

Vol. 3

From this past spring:

Quote:
Originally Posted by mario View Post
Without the sort of shutdown that we're seeing now, 80% of people would be infected and 4 million people would die within three months.

With "mitigation" strategies in place (all symptomatic cases in the US in isolation. Families of those cases quarantined. All Americans over 70 social distancing) 2 million people die in the next 3 months.

BUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUT

If we ever relax the suppression levels back to "mitigation" policies, we go right back to 2 million people dead within three months.

This continues until there is a disseminated vaccine, currently 18 months from now.
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Old 07-29-2020, 03:30 PM   #4251
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And NYC vs Florida is the face of full lockdown vs small/minor lockdown. That’s why we debate it.

If lockdowns save lives, which has been proven false unless health systems are overloaded, then NY, with fewer people and a younger pop, should have fewer deaths. Both states are similarly sized in terms of population and geography. In fact, their population density is within about 4% of each other.
__________________
Sober Thoughts with Mario: A TDC+ Exclusive

Vol. 3

From this past spring:

Quote:
Originally Posted by mario View Post
Without the sort of shutdown that we're seeing now, 80% of people would be infected and 4 million people would die within three months.

With "mitigation" strategies in place (all symptomatic cases in the US in isolation. Families of those cases quarantined. All Americans over 70 social distancing) 2 million people die in the next 3 months.

BUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUT

If we ever relax the suppression levels back to "mitigation" policies, we go right back to 2 million people dead within three months.

This continues until there is a disseminated vaccine, currently 18 months from now.
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Old 07-29-2020, 03:38 PM   #4252
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mario View Post
how many points does Florida get charged with for killing the MLB season?
The Marlins were likely infected in Atlanta, Philadelphia or somewhere in between.
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Old 07-29-2020, 03:45 PM   #4253
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh.0 View Post
And NYC vs Florida is the face of full lockdown vs small/minor lockdown. That’s why we debate it.

If lockdowns save lives, which has been proven false unless health systems are overloaded, then NY, with fewer people and a younger pop, should have fewer deaths. Both states are similarly sized in terms of population and geography. In fact, their population density is within about 4% of each other.
Just so we're clear, lockdowns were intended to flatten the curve (I know I hate when I say that too) to lessen the burden of hospitals. It was a tool to help mitigate the spread, which could in turn save lives.
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Old 07-29-2020, 04:05 PM   #4254
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Yeah, the point of the lockdowns was to save some lives, not every life. We'll never know how many lives were saved though. Sadly, we probably will be able to get a pretty good estimate on how many lives were lost because of the repercussions of the lockdowns. Still, they were a necessary tragedy because things would have been a hell of a lot worse without them.

From that Osterholm interview I posted yesterday:

Quote:
MICHAEL MORELL: So, Doctor, if you were advising the president, what would you tell him he should do? Would it make sense to call a do over here and start again and shut down the country for two weeks and then start testing, contact tracing, et cetera? Is that what we should do?

DR. MICHAEL OSTERHOLM: Well, the first thing I would do is something maybe not obvious and some people would maybe even frown upon it. But we need a Winston Churchill moment. We need an FDR moment. We need to bring everyone together and say, 'This is us versus the virus.'

Now, I'm not naive. I've been in this business for 45 years. I understand the issue of politics and partisan nature of things. But if there was ever a time we could minimize the partisan issues, whether it's about wearing masks or, you know, any other aspect of opening schools, how we do that -- now is the time for that. And if we could just all come together to say, 'How are we gonna do this?'

And that's -- if you look at countries where they've been successful in getting this under control, that has been one of the most important leadership qualities of the individual in that country, was to help people all understand, 'This is us versus the virus. It is not going to last forever. If we can get it taken care of now, we can minimize the impact and then go from there.' So that would be number one.

Number two is just what you just said. We have to understand why we're going to need some short-term pain again. And I understand the pain. I've had a dear friend lose a business. I know many people who've been out of jobs, who are desperate right now for work, single moms who don't have the money to pay the rent this month, and they can't go back to work because they've got three kids and the schools may or may not be meeting in session, but rather online, and the only backup care they have are grandpa and grandma who are both at risk of serious illness, and they're beside themselves. I understand that. And I know that we have to address that. We have to address that in a meaningful way.

But having said that, we're going to keep going through what we're doing right now if we don't change our approach, meaning, get these cases from, you know, 100 to 120 cases per 100,000 to below that of a few cases per 100,000. And then we can move through for the next six, eight, 10, 12 months, however long it might be, in a much, much more safe, relaxed and financially/economically stable world. And so I don't know any other way to do it. And I know people get upset when they hear me say this. I'm just the messenger. I'm not the message. And I think people just still have a hard time understanding it.
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Old 07-29-2020, 05:46 PM   #4255
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Houston Doc talking about having to choose who to save.

[Only registered users can see links.]

Quote:
HOUSTON, July 29 (Reuters) - The scene inside United Memorial Medical Center in Houston has become all too familiar: overwhelmed medical staff fighting to curb the wave of COVID-19 patients that come through the hospital's doors every day.

While in earlier pandemic hot spots like New York the medical emergency has subsided, Texas is among the many U.S. states battling a resurgence of the virus that is straining their healthcare systems.

Dr. Joseph Varon, the chief medical officer of United Memorial Medical Center (UMMC), said he is afraid he will soon face a dilemma many doctors elsewhere said they confronted earlier in the pandemic: deciding who to save.

"I'm afraid that at some point in time I'm going to have to make some very serious decisions," he told Reuters in an interview. "I'm starting to get the idea that I cannot save everybody."

Varon, 58, is overseeing the hospital's unit dedicated to COVID-19 patients, where he said he tends to an average of 40 people a day. He said he signed more death certificates in the last week than at any point in his career.

Earlier this month, Reuters followed the lung and critical care specialist on a shift as he hurried through the hallways - a small cohort of nurses and medical students in tow - pausing to inspect X-rays or medical charts and check on patients, at times offering them words of comfort or reaching out to hold their hand.

Many of those in Varon's COVID-19 unit needed nasal tubes to help them breathe, some required intubation.

In the afternoon, the physician and his team rushed to resuscitate a patient, performing CPR on the man who was later pronounced dead. Medical personnel covered his body in white sheets and wrapped it in a biohazard bag.

As the coronavirus pandemic that has gripped the nation for months showed little signs of abating, healthcare workers on the frontlines often fall prey to the virus that has killed over 150,000 people in the United States. (Graphic: [Only registered users can see links.] )

Varon's team is no exception. Christina Mathers, a 43-year-old nurse at UMMC, was told she tested positive for COVID-19 last week after she reported feeling ill during her shift.

"That's the hardest thing to ever hear... It messes with you," said Mathers, who has been working every other day since April 29. "But I wouldn't go anywhere else but here."

Varon, who was a hospital intern when a huge quake struck Mexico City in 1985, said dealing with the virus has been incredibly challenging for medical professionals. "Throughout my life, I have been in major disasters," he said. "Nothing has been as difficult to deal with (as) COVID."

Riley Harrison, 67, said he started feeling out of breath at work and that he struggled to get enough air in his lungs to call his wife, who also contracted the virus. Now, they are both hospitalized at UMMC.

"I couldn't breathe," Riley said in a whisper as oxygen flowed through tubes in his nose. "If you got a death wish, play with COVID."

Medical experts and officials have been sounding the alarm on the growing number of young people who are falling ill with COVID-19, warning they should not discount it as a virus dangerous for elderly people alone.

Eighteen-year-old Larissa Raudales had trouble breathing and said her lungs hurt when she was taken to UMMC. With medication, she was starting to feel better.

"I was terrified... I thought I couldn't breathe anymore," she said. "I just thought I was going to practically die right there."

Texas, along with California and Florida, has emerged as one of the new national hot spots. So far in July, the state has more than doubled its cases to over 400,000 total. Deaths rose by 32%, or over 1,000 lives lost, in the last week alone. But lately the number of new cases has slowed and hospitalized COVID-19 patients are down from record highs.

Dr. David Persse, the health authority for the Houston Health Department, said hospitals in the area were "struggling" as they dealt with a shortage of personnel to tackle a crisis that has been dragging out for months.

"The people who work in hospitals are exhausted... It takes a physical and an emotional toll on you," he said. "It's not always been pretty but it's been functional, and this is why we call it a disaster."
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Old 07-29-2020, 05:53 PM   #4256
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Quote:
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Houston Doc talking about theoretically having to choose who to save.
FTFY.

The patients would go to other facilities that have staff available. That’s the job of healthcare administrators, if they don’t do that it’s because they’re chasing the CMS incentives.

Plus, cases in Texas are dropping and have been dropping for a while.
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Sober Thoughts with Mario: A TDC+ Exclusive

Vol. 3

From this past spring:

Quote:
Originally Posted by mario View Post
Without the sort of shutdown that we're seeing now, 80% of people would be infected and 4 million people would die within three months.

With "mitigation" strategies in place (all symptomatic cases in the US in isolation. Families of those cases quarantined. All Americans over 70 social distancing) 2 million people die in the next 3 months.

BUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUTBUT

If we ever relax the suppression levels back to "mitigation" policies, we go right back to 2 million people dead within three months.

This continues until there is a disseminated vaccine, currently 18 months from now.
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Old 07-29-2020, 06:15 PM   #4257
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh.0 View Post
FTFY.

The patients would go to other facilities that have staff available. That’s the job of healthcare administrators, if they don’t do that it’s because they’re chasing the CMS incentives.

Plus, cases in Texas are dropping and have been dropping for a while.
Yup.
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Old 07-30-2020, 07:38 AM   #4258
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Josh getting his health updates from the same place as Laura Ingraham.
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Originally Posted by Tambourine Man View Post
I saw that healthcare workers in CO are blocking the cars from protesting.

I really didn’t want to go there but: fuck these people. Nurses make $100k/year with full benefits. I don’t feel sorry for them at all that they might catch a flu that’s not going to do anything to them. Such a stupid opportunity that they’re fully exploiting to jerk themselves off.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh.0 View Post
The fact that they came outside in their scrubs - which they’re supposed to be keeping as clean and “uncompromised” as possible - tells you it was virtue signaling in an attempt to go viral. Just like all of the dumb TikTok videos that bored nurses in empty hospitals have been putting together across the country the last few weeks
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Old 07-30-2020, 08:16 AM   #4259
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Societal Changes: [Only registered users can see links.] . This happened largely because Universal started releasing movies direct to home during the shutdown and was successful enough to threaten theaters. Previously, theaters had 90 day exclusivity. We'll forever remember TROLLS WORLD TOUR for being the film the killed movie theaters.
Comcast NBCUniversal’s Universal Pictures division has reached a landmark agreement with the biggest theater chain in the U.S., AMC Theatres, allowing the film distributor to release its titles straight to consume living rooms via premium VOD rental just 17 days after their theatrical release date.

The deal culminates over a decade of rising tension between movie distributors and exhibitors, with the former increasingly anxious to establish flexibility for marginal titles. That tension has boiled over amid the COVID-19 pandemic, with theaters shut down and studios looking for other ways to monetize their titles.

The Universal-AMC deal allows the theater chain to participate in the premium VOD window.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tambourine Man View Post
I saw that healthcare workers in CO are blocking the cars from protesting.

I really didn’t want to go there but: fuck these people. Nurses make $100k/year with full benefits. I don’t feel sorry for them at all that they might catch a flu that’s not going to do anything to them. Such a stupid opportunity that they’re fully exploiting to jerk themselves off.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh.0 View Post
The fact that they came outside in their scrubs - which they’re supposed to be keeping as clean and “uncompromised” as possible - tells you it was virtue signaling in an attempt to go viral. Just like all of the dumb TikTok videos that bored nurses in empty hospitals have been putting together across the country the last few weeks
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Old 07-30-2020, 09:01 AM   #4260
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In other news, people in Northeast PA are rejoicing that the local Cinemark theater in Scranton is opening and showing $5 classic movies such as Back to the Future. You know, these simpletons can't wait to pay $5 a head instead of staying home during a pandemic to watch that shit on Netflix.
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