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Old 01-12-2021, 01:27 PM   #1
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Personal experiences with COVID-19

Hey all - I wanted to branch a separate conversation out where people can speak up (should they so choose) about their personal experience(s) with COVID-19, whether itís what they went through individually or experiences close family/friends have had. Please, letís keep ďmy sisterís bossís uncleís little sister had COVIDĒ omitted from this thread, unless you, yourself, are close with the person and can confidently speak towards what they endured.

Also, please - seriously - no political garbage or infighting. Iíd appreciate keeping this thread friendly and, where necessary, a place to support anyone dealing with outbreaks within their own social/familial circles.

Iíll start:

-Over Christmas my oldest sister (42) tested positive but only showed minor overall symptoms (gastrointestinal issues, fever). She has recovered completely.

-My brother-in-lawís mother (whom I do know well), is around 70 and in very poor health, was hit hard but never needed hospitalization. She was mostly bedridden for a week and seems to have rebounded completely in the last couple of weeks.

-My girlfriendís mom (55, in decent overall health) had it a month ago, and she, too, was bedridden for a week but made a full recovery. Oddly enough, neither my girlfriend nor her father contracted it despite being in close proximity with her for all of the days/weeks leading up to the diagnosis.

-A fellow toga teacher currently has it and appears to be mostly asymptomatic.

-A few of my students (all under 40) have reported having it since March and none had serious bouts, though one did lose her sense of taste and smell for a couple months.
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Old 01-12-2021, 01:37 PM   #2
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A 60-year-old coworker of mine got it in March/April, and her sense of taste still hasn't come back.
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Old 01-12-2021, 01:42 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Tomacco View Post
A 60-year-old coworker of mine got it in March/April, and her sense of taste still hasn't come back.
I've heard anecdotal stories of this. The sense of taste thing is so strange with this virus.
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Old 01-12-2021, 01:54 PM   #4
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Yeah it really is odd, I’ve never heard of that with any other virus, but maybe it does happen with others but we rarely hear about it? That’s probably the symptom that boggles my mind the most because everything else appears to happen within several other viral infections.
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US /ˈtɑː.lɚ.əns/ UK /ˈtɒl.ər.əns/
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Old 01-12-2021, 02:25 PM   #5
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My wife tested positive yesterday. She works for a nursing home, so she’s swabbed 2x a week. She started feeling symptoms on Saturday - postnasal drip, loss of smell/taste, and feeling run down. The test yesterday morning confirmed it, so she’s out for at least 10 days.

The nursing home that she works at has seen an explosion of cases (both residents and staff). All precautions are taken (PPE, sanitizing, etc.), and yet she and others still got it.
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Old 01-12-2021, 02:31 PM   #6
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My wife tested positive yesterday. She works for a nursing home, so sheís swabbed 2x a week. She started feeling symptoms on Saturday - postnasal drip, loss of smell/taste, and feeling run down. The test yesterday morning confirmed it, so sheís out for at least 10 days.

The nursing home that she works at has seen an explosion of cases (both residents and staff). All precautions are taken (PPE, sanitizing, etc.), and yet she and others still got it.
Have they been vaccinated yet?
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Old 01-12-2021, 02:33 PM   #7
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Did not mention it before but my 89 year old Grandmother tested positive the week after Christmas. She was in a home that tested everyone twice a week. Completely asymptomatic. They gave her and the 15 others in her facility who tested positive monclonal antibody treatment, kept her in isolation for two weeks, then went back to normal.

Pretty crazy.
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Old 01-12-2021, 02:35 PM   #8
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Have they been vaccinated yet?
Theyíre going through vaccinations now. Coincidentally, my wife was supposed to get her first dose yesterday. That obviously didnít happen due to the positive.
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Old 01-12-2021, 02:40 PM   #9
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Vorony that sucks... there were definitely staff members in my grandmother's home who also tested positive, though we don't know how many.

I know my grandmother and others at her home were supposed to be vaccinated by now but anybody who received the antibody treatment has to wait 6 weeks before they can get the vaccination now.
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Old 01-12-2021, 03:35 PM   #10
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I’ve had several coworkers, and my direct report manager, all get it (Dayton is a fucking disaster for COVID), and my brother got it early in the spread last year, but so far everyone has been fine once it passed.
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Old 01-12-2021, 06:55 PM   #11
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Sorry for the length of this post but I had kind of a shitty December. First week of December I was moving some heavy stuff at the house, nothing too crazy, but heavy household furnishings like cabinets, and bureaus, some large shelving. Anyway, the following morning I woke up to my left leg being swollen to the point I couldn't even see my knee or make out any definition in my calf, my foot was swollen and my lower back on the left side had sharp pains so instantly I thought maybe it was a sciatic nerve issue so I stayed in bed all day, elevated my leg hoping that would help. The next morning my right leg began to swell, not as bad as the left but it was still swelling. Even just standing to take a piss, I was sweating bullets...it was so painful to even stand. Decided to go to the emergency room. However because of Covid, my wife was not even allowed into the check-in of the emergency room. Little did I know I wouldn't see her again for almost two weeks.

They checked me in, gave me a Covid test, and a few attending Doctors took a look and their first thought was blood clots. They asked for my Covid test to be rushed because one of the many outcomes from Covid-19 is blood-clotting. The test came back negative and they sent me off to get all the tests done, ultrasounds, cat scans, a lot of blood work. Then they asked for a second Covid test before they officially admit me in to my own room. The second test came back negative as well. However, after all the tests were done they found extreme blood clots from my legs leading back up to my abdomen. They said it was so bad that they had to keep 24-hour watch on me while I awaited surgery. I had to wait 3 days before I could have the surgery because they needed to thin my blood enough to perform the surgery. They kept running more blood tests, checked my lungs, my heart, brain, everything. By some miracle I had no signs of clotting in my lungs and my heart did not have any evidence of passable clotting which is where it would go to get to the brain. But the issue was still that the blood was collecting in my legs, and they still had no choice but to continue taking blood samples every few hours to make sure the IV blood thinner I was on was doing it's job and if they had to increase the dosage, which they had to a few times. And also, every day I was tested for Covid, and everyday I was negative.

I have sleep apnea and I use a C-PAP machine to sleep. I don't even take a nap without that thing, but they would not allow me to use it because of Covid protocols. I could barely sleep. I think in the 10 days I was there, I probably slept 12 hours total. No joke. It was so frustrating because my wife couldn't even be there as they don't allow visitors, I wasn't allowed to have a small fan in my room, they wouldn't even allow me to use my medical equipment which fucking keeps me alive through the night...even some of the nurses thought that was a little over the top. I was covid-free on a covid-free floor/wing of the hospital and I couldn't even use my Dr. prescribed equipment. A lot of these "protocols" you think are set in place for protection and for the most part...of course they are, but then you just experience the absolute absurdity of it all when I was taken down for my tests (cat scan, ultrasounds, etc...) and after I was done, they leave me on the gurney out in the hall for 15/20 min waiting for the transport guy to come bring me back t my room, however I'm there waiting and meanwhile all these extremely sick patients are slowly passing me coughing, sneezing, hacking up lungs, even a few were stopped within inches of me for a few minutes. I kept thinking...even if I came in covid-free...I'm sure as hell leaving with Covid that's for sure. Talk about stress-inducing. I spoke to every nurse that came into my room asking about Covid and their experiences (I needed some distraction as the TV in my room was broken and I can only stare at my phone for so long) and they were all relating to my experience saying A LOT of covid-free patients were coming in and actually getting covid just from being at the Hospital for more than a few days.

Anyway, surgery day came and they prepped me in the ICU and said after the surgery they had to keep me in the ICU because of how massive the clotting was and they needed to closely monitor all my levels (heart, breathing, blood, everything). I've had surgeries before, never been nervous or scare and this was no exception. The surgeon seemed great, all the staff were super helpful and reassuring and kind....but the moment I was wheeled into that operating room...I was dead-scared and though I was surrounded by 10 or 12 nurses, doctors, anesthesiologists, etc..I've never felt more alone in my entire life. A large part of that was I think my brain was just completely exhausted from only having like 4 hours of sleep in 4 days and it all just hit me at once and it was completely overwhelming. And I will say this though...at least there are Doctors and nurses who still have a great sense of humor even with all this shit going on because I had spoken to the surgeon about how many times I had been tested for Covid and RIGHT before they knocked me out I heard one of the nurses ask if I had been tested that day and the surgeon looked at me and we both laughed and then I was out.

I woke up post-op in the ICU and it felt like someone poured ice water in my veins, I had never been so cold in my life and they just kept putting these really warm blankets on me which felt so good. The surgeon came in to see me later that day before they brought me back to my room and told me how extensive these clots were and how lucky I was to have somehow triggered them by doing all that heavy lifting because probably another few more weeks and it would have been a lot worse and once they would have hit my lungs and I caught Covid...the recovery rate for that is like 15%.

Had to stay in the hospital for another 6 days, and the recovery at home (finally getting an appetite, not feeling nauseous, being able to walk normally, all that) took another 3 weeks.

Anyway, just wanted to stress a few things here. One is that even though some scary moments I had like being near clearly covid sick patients, I would still suggest if you feel like something is truly bothering you don't be afraid to go to the hospital because if something truly is wrong with you and THEN you catch this fucking thing, the outcome could be a A LOT worse. Secondly, I'm very lucky to live where I do, outside of Boston where some of the best hospitals in country are located. The one I attended is used by Harvard medical students, and I am fortunate enough to also have good insurance and it just makes you appreciate what you have so much more when things like this happen because millions of of people in this country are not that fortunate. And lastly, I mentioned this in the other Covid thread that a lot of Nurses and Doctors were turning away their place in line for the vaccine because they are trying to push their administrators to get a plan in place for medical staffers which include non-licensed help such as waste management and janitorial services, stock and supply staff, etc... We tend to forget how integral these people are to the everyday running of these hospitals. Doctors and Nurses get all the attention but ask any one of them and they will tell you the staff who clean rooms, replace supplies, fix equipment...those people are ALSO on the frontlines helping the hospitals operate even at capacity and are just as equally as exposed as anyone else in those Covid wings of those buildings. Just wanted to say that.
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Old 01-12-2021, 07:26 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Josh.0 View Post
Yeah it really is odd, Iíve never heard of that with any other virus, but maybe it does happen with others but we rarely hear about it? Thatís probably the symptom that boggles my mind the most because everything else appears to happen within several other viral infections.
Thatís because this bastard is probably man made.
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Old 01-12-2021, 07:37 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Fan#41 View Post
Sorry for the length of this post but I had kind of a shitty December. First week of December I was moving some heavy stuff at the house, nothing too crazy, but heavy household furnishings like cabinets, and bureaus, some large shelving. Anyway, the following morning I woke up to my left leg being swollen to the point I couldn't even see my knee or make out any definition in my calf, my foot was swollen and my lower back on the left side had sharp pains so instantly I thought maybe it was a sciatic nerve issue so I stayed in bed all day, elevated my leg hoping that would help. The next morning my right leg began to swell, not as bad as the left but it was still swelling. Even just standing to take a piss, I was sweating bullets...it was so painful to even stand. Decided to go to the emergency room. However because of Covid, my wife was not even allowed into the check-in of the emergency room. Little did I know I wouldn't see her again for almost two weeks.

They checked me in, gave me a Covid test, and a few attending Doctors took a look and their first thought was blood clots. They asked for my Covid test to be rushed because one of the many outcomes from Covid-19 is blood-clotting. The test came back negative and they sent me off to get all the tests done, ultrasounds, cat scans, a lot of blood work. Then they asked for a second Covid test before they officially admit me in to my own room. The second test came back negative as well. However, after all the tests were done they found extreme blood clots from my legs leading back up to my abdomen. They said it was so bad that they had to keep 24-hour watch on me while I awaited surgery. I had to wait 3 days before I could have the surgery because they needed to thin my blood enough to perform the surgery. They kept running more blood tests, checked my lungs, my heart, brain, everything. By some miracle I had no signs of clotting in my lungs and my heart did not have any evidence of passable clotting which is where it would go to get to the brain. But the issue was still that the blood was collecting in my legs, and they still had no choice but to continue taking blood samples every few hours to make sure the IV blood thinner I was on was doing it's job and if they had to increase the dosage, which they had to a few times. And also, every day I was tested for Covid, and everyday I was negative.

I have sleep apnea and I use a C-PAP machine to sleep. I don't even take a nap without that thing, but they would not allow me to use it because of Covid protocols. I could barely sleep. I think in the 10 days I was there, I probably slept 12 hours total. No joke. It was so frustrating because my wife couldn't even be there as they don't allow visitors, I wasn't allowed to have a small fan in my room, they wouldn't even allow me to use my medical equipment which fucking keeps me alive through the night...even some of the nurses thought that was a little over the top. I was covid-free on a covid-free floor/wing of the hospital and I couldn't even use my Dr. prescribed equipment. A lot of these "protocols" you think are set in place for protection and for the most part...of course they are, but then you just experience the absolute absurdity of it all when I was taken down for my tests (cat scan, ultrasounds, etc...) and after I was done, they leave me on the gurney out in the hall for 15/20 min waiting for the transport guy to come bring me back t my room, however I'm there waiting and meanwhile all these extremely sick patients are slowly passing me coughing, sneezing, hacking up lungs, even a few were stopped within inches of me for a few minutes. I kept thinking...even if I came in covid-free...I'm sure as hell leaving with Covid that's for sure. Talk about stress-inducing. I spoke to every nurse that came into my room asking about Covid and their experiences (I needed some distraction as the TV in my room was broken and I can only stare at my phone for so long) and they were all relating to my experience saying A LOT of covid-free patients were coming in and actually getting covid just from being at the Hospital for more than a few days.

Anyway, surgery day came and they prepped me in the ICU and said after the surgery they had to keep me in the ICU because of how massive the clotting was and they needed to closely monitor all my levels (heart, breathing, blood, everything). I've had surgeries before, never been nervous or scare and this was no exception. The surgeon seemed great, all the staff were super helpful and reassuring and kind....but the moment I was wheeled into that operating room...I was dead-scared and though I was surrounded by 10 or 12 nurses, doctors, anesthesiologists, etc..I've never felt more alone in my entire life. A large part of that was I think my brain was just completely exhausted from only having like 4 hours of sleep in 4 days and it all just hit me at once and it was completely overwhelming. And I will say this though...at least there are Doctors and nurses who still have a great sense of humor even with all this shit going on because I had spoken to the surgeon about how many times I had been tested for Covid and RIGHT before they knocked me out I heard one of the nurses ask if I had been tested that day and the surgeon looked at me and we both laughed and then I was out.

I woke up post-op in the ICU and it felt like someone poured ice water in my veins, I had never been so cold in my life and they just kept putting these really warm blankets on me which felt so good. The surgeon came in to see me later that day before they brought me back to my room and told me how extensive these clots were and how lucky I was to have somehow triggered them by doing all that heavy lifting because probably another few more weeks and it would have been a lot worse and once they would have hit my lungs and I caught Covid...the recovery rate for that is like 15%.

Had to stay in the hospital for another 6 days, and the recovery at home (finally getting an appetite, not feeling nauseous, being able to walk normally, all that) took another 3 weeks.

Anyway, just wanted to stress a few things here. One is that even though some scary moments I had like being near clearly covid sick patients, I would still suggest if you feel like something is truly bothering you don't be afraid to go to the hospital because if something truly is wrong with you and THEN you catch this fucking thing, the outcome could be a A LOT worse. Secondly, I'm very lucky to live where I do, outside of Boston where some of the best hospitals in country are located. The one I attended is used by Harvard medical students, and I am fortunate enough to also have good insurance and it just makes you appreciate what you have so much more when things like this happen because millions of of people in this country are not that fortunate. And lastly, I mentioned this in the other Covid thread that a lot of Nurses and Doctors were turning away their place in line for the vaccine because they are trying to push their administrators to get a plan in place for medical staffers which include non-licensed help such as waste management and janitorial services, stock and supply staff, etc... We tend to forget how integral these people are to the everyday running of these hospitals. Doctors and Nurses get all the attention but ask any one of them and they will tell you the staff who clean rooms, replace supplies, fix equipment...those people are ALSO on the frontlines helping the hospitals operate even at capacity and are just as equally as exposed as anyone else in those Covid wings of those buildings. Just wanted to say that.
That is a harrowing story, so sorry to hear about it. Glad you made it out okay.
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Old 01-12-2021, 07:46 PM   #14
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Sorry you had to go through all that. Glad everything is okay now.
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Old 01-12-2021, 11:00 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Fan#41 View Post
Sorry for the length of this post but I had kind of a shitty December. First week of December I was moving some heavy stuff at the house, nothing too crazy, but heavy household furnishings like cabinets, and bureaus, some large shelving. Anyway, the following morning I woke up to my left leg being swollen to the point I couldn't even see my knee or make out any definition in my calf, my foot was swollen and my lower back on the left side had sharp pains so instantly I thought maybe it was a sciatic nerve issue so I stayed in bed all day, elevated my leg hoping that would help. The next morning my right leg began to swell, not as bad as the left but it was still swelling. Even just standing to take a piss, I was sweating bullets...it was so painful to even stand. Decided to go to the emergency room. However because of Covid, my wife was not even allowed into the check-in of the emergency room. Little did I know I wouldn't see her again for almost two weeks.

They checked me in, gave me a Covid test, and a few attending Doctors took a look and their first thought was blood clots. They asked for my Covid test to be rushed because one of the many outcomes from Covid-19 is blood-clotting. The test came back negative and they sent me off to get all the tests done, ultrasounds, cat scans, a lot of blood work. Then they asked for a second Covid test before they officially admit me in to my own room. The second test came back negative as well. However, after all the tests were done they found extreme blood clots from my legs leading back up to my abdomen. They said it was so bad that they had to keep 24-hour watch on me while I awaited surgery. I had to wait 3 days before I could have the surgery because they needed to thin my blood enough to perform the surgery. They kept running more blood tests, checked my lungs, my heart, brain, everything. By some miracle I had no signs of clotting in my lungs and my heart did not have any evidence of passable clotting which is where it would go to get to the brain. But the issue was still that the blood was collecting in my legs, and they still had no choice but to continue taking blood samples every few hours to make sure the IV blood thinner I was on was doing it's job and if they had to increase the dosage, which they had to a few times. And also, every day I was tested for Covid, and everyday I was negative.

I have sleep apnea and I use a C-PAP machine to sleep. I don't even take a nap without that thing, but they would not allow me to use it because of Covid protocols. I could barely sleep. I think in the 10 days I was there, I probably slept 12 hours total. No joke. It was so frustrating because my wife couldn't even be there as they don't allow visitors, I wasn't allowed to have a small fan in my room, they wouldn't even allow me to use my medical equipment which fucking keeps me alive through the night...even some of the nurses thought that was a little over the top. I was covid-free on a covid-free floor/wing of the hospital and I couldn't even use my Dr. prescribed equipment. A lot of these "protocols" you think are set in place for protection and for the most part...of course they are, but then you just experience the absolute absurdity of it all when I was taken down for my tests (cat scan, ultrasounds, etc...) and after I was done, they leave me on the gurney out in the hall for 15/20 min waiting for the transport guy to come bring me back t my room, however I'm there waiting and meanwhile all these extremely sick patients are slowly passing me coughing, sneezing, hacking up lungs, even a few were stopped within inches of me for a few minutes. I kept thinking...even if I came in covid-free...I'm sure as hell leaving with Covid that's for sure. Talk about stress-inducing. I spoke to every nurse that came into my room asking about Covid and their experiences (I needed some distraction as the TV in my room was broken and I can only stare at my phone for so long) and they were all relating to my experience saying A LOT of covid-free patients were coming in and actually getting covid just from being at the Hospital for more than a few days.

Anyway, surgery day came and they prepped me in the ICU and said after the surgery they had to keep me in the ICU because of how massive the clotting was and they needed to closely monitor all my levels (heart, breathing, blood, everything). I've had surgeries before, never been nervous or scare and this was no exception. The surgeon seemed great, all the staff were super helpful and reassuring and kind....but the moment I was wheeled into that operating room...I was dead-scared and though I was surrounded by 10 or 12 nurses, doctors, anesthesiologists, etc..I've never felt more alone in my entire life. A large part of that was I think my brain was just completely exhausted from only having like 4 hours of sleep in 4 days and it all just hit me at once and it was completely overwhelming. And I will say this though...at least there are Doctors and nurses who still have a great sense of humor even with all this shit going on because I had spoken to the surgeon about how many times I had been tested for Covid and RIGHT before they knocked me out I heard one of the nurses ask if I had been tested that day and the surgeon looked at me and we both laughed and then I was out.

I woke up post-op in the ICU and it felt like someone poured ice water in my veins, I had never been so cold in my life and they just kept putting these really warm blankets on me which felt so good. The surgeon came in to see me later that day before they brought me back to my room and told me how extensive these clots were and how lucky I was to have somehow triggered them by doing all that heavy lifting because probably another few more weeks and it would have been a lot worse and once they would have hit my lungs and I caught Covid...the recovery rate for that is like 15%.

Had to stay in the hospital for another 6 days, and the recovery at home (finally getting an appetite, not feeling nauseous, being able to walk normally, all that) took another 3 weeks.

Anyway, just wanted to stress a few things here. One is that even though some scary moments I had like being near clearly covid sick patients, I would still suggest if you feel like something is truly bothering you don't be afraid to go to the hospital because if something truly is wrong with you and THEN you catch this fucking thing, the outcome could be a A LOT worse. Secondly, I'm very lucky to live where I do, outside of Boston where some of the best hospitals in country are located. The one I attended is used by Harvard medical students, and I am fortunate enough to also have good insurance and it just makes you appreciate what you have so much more when things like this happen because millions of of people in this country are not that fortunate. And lastly, I mentioned this in the other Covid thread that a lot of Nurses and Doctors were turning away their place in line for the vaccine because they are trying to push their administrators to get a plan in place for medical staffers which include non-licensed help such as waste management and janitorial services, stock and supply staff, etc... We tend to forget how integral these people are to the everyday running of these hospitals. Doctors and Nurses get all the attention but ask any one of them and they will tell you the staff who clean rooms, replace supplies, fix equipment...those people are ALSO on the frontlines helping the hospitals operate even at capacity and are just as equally as exposed as anyone else in those Covid wings of those buildings. Just wanted to say that.
Wow Brandon, that is a very sobering story. Thanks for sharing that
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Old 01-12-2021, 11:41 PM   #16
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Wow that’s crazy. Can’t imagine..
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Old 01-13-2021, 08:47 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Fan#41 View Post
Sorry for the length of this post but I had kind of a shitty December. First week of December I was moving some heavy stuff at the house, nothing too crazy, but heavy household furnishings like cabinets, and bureaus, some large shelving. Anyway, the following morning I woke up to my left leg being swollen to the point I couldn't even see my knee or make out any definition in my calf, my foot was swollen and my lower back on the left side had sharp pains so instantly I thought maybe it was a sciatic nerve issue so I stayed in bed all day, elevated my leg hoping that would help. The next morning my right leg began to swell, not as bad as the left but it was still swelling. Even just standing to take a piss, I was sweating bullets...it was so painful to even stand. Decided to go to the emergency room. However because of Covid, my wife was not even allowed into the check-in of the emergency room. Little did I know I wouldn't see her again for almost two weeks.

They checked me in, gave me a Covid test, and a few attending Doctors took a look and their first thought was blood clots. They asked for my Covid test to be rushed because one of the many outcomes from Covid-19 is blood-clotting. The test came back negative and they sent me off to get all the tests done, ultrasounds, cat scans, a lot of blood work. Then they asked for a second Covid test before they officially admit me in to my own room. The second test came back negative as well. However, after all the tests were done they found extreme blood clots from my legs leading back up to my abdomen. They said it was so bad that they had to keep 24-hour watch on me while I awaited surgery. I had to wait 3 days before I could have the surgery because they needed to thin my blood enough to perform the surgery. They kept running more blood tests, checked my lungs, my heart, brain, everything. By some miracle I had no signs of clotting in my lungs and my heart did not have any evidence of passable clotting which is where it would go to get to the brain. But the issue was still that the blood was collecting in my legs, and they still had no choice but to continue taking blood samples every few hours to make sure the IV blood thinner I was on was doing it's job and if they had to increase the dosage, which they had to a few times. And also, every day I was tested for Covid, and everyday I was negative.

I have sleep apnea and I use a C-PAP machine to sleep. I don't even take a nap without that thing, but they would not allow me to use it because of Covid protocols. I could barely sleep. I think in the 10 days I was there, I probably slept 12 hours total. No joke. It was so frustrating because my wife couldn't even be there as they don't allow visitors, I wasn't allowed to have a small fan in my room, they wouldn't even allow me to use my medical equipment which fucking keeps me alive through the night...even some of the nurses thought that was a little over the top. I was covid-free on a covid-free floor/wing of the hospital and I couldn't even use my Dr. prescribed equipment. A lot of these "protocols" you think are set in place for protection and for the most part...of course they are, but then you just experience the absolute absurdity of it all when I was taken down for my tests (cat scan, ultrasounds, etc...) and after I was done, they leave me on the gurney out in the hall for 15/20 min waiting for the transport guy to come bring me back t my room, however I'm there waiting and meanwhile all these extremely sick patients are slowly passing me coughing, sneezing, hacking up lungs, even a few were stopped within inches of me for a few minutes. I kept thinking...even if I came in covid-free...I'm sure as hell leaving with Covid that's for sure. Talk about stress-inducing. I spoke to every nurse that came into my room asking about Covid and their experiences (I needed some distraction as the TV in my room was broken and I can only stare at my phone for so long) and they were all relating to my experience saying A LOT of covid-free patients were coming in and actually getting covid just from being at the Hospital for more than a few days.

Anyway, surgery day came and they prepped me in the ICU and said after the surgery they had to keep me in the ICU because of how massive the clotting was and they needed to closely monitor all my levels (heart, breathing, blood, everything). I've had surgeries before, never been nervous or scare and this was no exception. The surgeon seemed great, all the staff were super helpful and reassuring and kind....but the moment I was wheeled into that operating room...I was dead-scared and though I was surrounded by 10 or 12 nurses, doctors, anesthesiologists, etc..I've never felt more alone in my entire life. A large part of that was I think my brain was just completely exhausted from only having like 4 hours of sleep in 4 days and it all just hit me at once and it was completely overwhelming. And I will say this though...at least there are Doctors and nurses who still have a great sense of humor even with all this shit going on because I had spoken to the surgeon about how many times I had been tested for Covid and RIGHT before they knocked me out I heard one of the nurses ask if I had been tested that day and the surgeon looked at me and we both laughed and then I was out.

I woke up post-op in the ICU and it felt like someone poured ice water in my veins, I had never been so cold in my life and they just kept putting these really warm blankets on me which felt so good. The surgeon came in to see me later that day before they brought me back to my room and told me how extensive these clots were and how lucky I was to have somehow triggered them by doing all that heavy lifting because probably another few more weeks and it would have been a lot worse and once they would have hit my lungs and I caught Covid...the recovery rate for that is like 15%.

Had to stay in the hospital for another 6 days, and the recovery at home (finally getting an appetite, not feeling nauseous, being able to walk normally, all that) took another 3 weeks.

Anyway, just wanted to stress a few things here. One is that even though some scary moments I had like being near clearly covid sick patients, I would still suggest if you feel like something is truly bothering you don't be afraid to go to the hospital because if something truly is wrong with you and THEN you catch this fucking thing, the outcome could be a A LOT worse. Secondly, I'm very lucky to live where I do, outside of Boston where some of the best hospitals in country are located. The one I attended is used by Harvard medical students, and I am fortunate enough to also have good insurance and it just makes you appreciate what you have so much more when things like this happen because millions of of people in this country are not that fortunate. And lastly, I mentioned this in the other Covid thread that a lot of Nurses and Doctors were turning away their place in line for the vaccine because they are trying to push their administrators to get a plan in place for medical staffers which include non-licensed help such as waste management and janitorial services, stock and supply staff, etc... We tend to forget how integral these people are to the everyday running of these hospitals. Doctors and Nurses get all the attention but ask any one of them and they will tell you the staff who clean rooms, replace supplies, fix equipment...those people are ALSO on the frontlines helping the hospitals operate even at capacity and are just as equally as exposed as anyone else in those Covid wings of those buildings. Just wanted to say that.
Geez that is rough, I'm glad everything worked out ok.
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Old 01-13-2021, 11:38 AM   #18
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Glad to hear you folks have been able to successfully deal with your struggles. Brandon, that's crazy. Happy to hear they caught it in time.

My one sister and her fiancť may have had Covid but the tests kept coming back negative. He is studying to become a nurse and part of his work has been in an old folks' home.

Other relatives and friends have been tested but all have come back negative.

My grandmother's sister had it, and although she's unwell, she recovered.
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Old 01-13-2021, 12:17 PM   #19
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Thanks for posting the story, Brandon. Iím glad you got the treatment and insight that you did
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Old 01-13-2021, 12:19 PM   #20
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Lost two coworkers in Michigan who were over 70, not the greatest shape in general and it ravaged their bodies pretty quickly.

I cannot stress this enough, please take care of yourself now because later in life, the time won't be there to help yourself.
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